Biostatistics

Identifying predictors of progression to AIDS and mortality post-HIV infection using parametric multistate model


Abstract


OBJECTIVES: The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has already remained as a major public health problem all over the world. This study aimed to identify the prognostic factors influencing the disease progression in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in Iran, using parametric multi-state models to take into account the intermediate event in the analysis.  

METHOD(S): The data of the present retrospective cohort study was extracted in Tehran from April 2004 to March 2014. The number of 2473 HIV-infected patients in Behavioral Diseases Counseling Centers was enrolled. The outcomes of interest were the transition times from HIV diagnosis to AIDS and AIDS to death. The effect of several prognostic factors on both transitions was investigated.

RESULTS: Parametric models indicated that AIDS progression was significantly associated with an increase in age (P = 0.017), low education (P = 0.026), and a decreased CD4 cell count (P = 0.001). Furthermore, the AIDS-related death was significantly associated with male sex (P = 0.010), tuberculosis coinfection (P = 0.001), antiretroviral therapy (P = 0.001) and a decreased CD4 cell count (P = 0.035).

CONCLUSION: The results of this study indicated that CD4 cell count was one of the most important prognostic factors that affected and accelerated both HIV→AIDS and AIDS→DEATH transitions and antiretroviral treatment was found to be an effective measure in decelerating survival of patients with AIDS to death state. The usual Cox Model is not able to identify some of these prognostic factors. 


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NBN: http://nbn.depositolegale.it/urn%3Anbn%3Ait%3Aprex-20412

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2427/12438

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Copyright (c) 2013 Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Public Health

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EBPH Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Public Health | ISSN 2282-0930

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.