Original Articles

The Heterogeneous Effects of Family Structure on Early Child Health


Abstract


Background

Ending preventable deaths of newborns and children under 5 years of age by 2030 is one of the targets of the Sustainable Development Goals. Data from the 2013-14 Zambia Demographic and Health Survey shows that there has been improvements in some indicators of child health over the years and this has coincided with the widespread demographic changes in family formation. It’s hypothesized that children from monogamous households tend to have much better health outcomes compared to single or polygynous households. This study therefore set out to examine the effect of heterogeneous family structures on early child health.

Methods

Using data from the 2013-14 ZDHS, the study employed the Kids Recode (KR) data file which contains information about children under the age of five (5) of interviewed women. The analysis was conducted at three levels: descriptive, bivariate and multivariate.

 Results

The study established that family structure had a statistically significant effect on early child health and that there was heterogeneity in the health outcomes of the children from different forms of marriage, with the ever married and polygamous marriage categories showing higher odds of having underweight children. The study also established that mother’s nutrition status, region, sex of child, mother’s age at birth of the child and child vaccination were also among other factors associated with the early child health in Zambia.

 Conclusion

There is need for the government to implement policies that will limit the exposure of children to adverse health which would require more costly interventions later in life.


Full Text:

PDF


DOI: https://doi.org/10.2427/12706

References



Article Metrics

Metrics Loading ...

Metrics powered by PLOS ALM

Refbacks

  • There are currently no refbacks.


Copyright (c) 2013 Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Public Health

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue to use this site we will assume that you are happy with it (Read more).
Ok


EBPH Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Public Health | ISSN 2282-0930

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.