Original Articles

Willingness to pay for vaccination against hepatitis B and its determinants: the case study of an industrial district of Pakistan


Abstract


Willingness to pay (WTP) for vaccination of hepatitis disease is a good measureto monetize the physical effects of a disease into monetary values. Therefore, the present study aims to find the willingness to pay for self-paid vaccines for hepatitis and its determinants in an industrial district Faisalabad, Pakistan Primary data were collected from 200 non-patients of hepatitis which were personally interviewed by using convenient sampling method. A scenario was presented to the selected respondents by using CVM technique. The respondents were randomly assigned to pre-chosen payment bids defined on the basis of prevailing market rates for vaccination at the time of survey.  The multivariate linear regression was used to find the determinants of WTP. This shows that females are slightly more willing to pay as compared with males. The variables age, income and awareness about hepatitis has positive impact on WTP for vaccination of hepatitis disease.About 57.3 percent people belonging to low income group wanted free vaccination for hepatitis in Pakistan. Government should launch free vaccination programs for the most vulnerable group (poor) and must launch awareness campaign to increase knowledge of population.




DOI: https://doi.org/10.2427/12954

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EBPH Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Public Health | ISSN 2282-0930

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.