Original Articles

Mother Schooling and Malnutrition among Children of Rural-Urban Pakistan


Abstract


Purpose

Although many causes of malnutrition are discussed in previous studies, the impact of mother schooling on infant malnutrition in the context rural-urban comparison and mediating factors is not posited in case of Pakistan. Hence, this study will examine the effect of mother schooling and intervening linkages on acute and chronic malnutrition to format effective strategies.

Design

The prior empirical relationship is examined by calculating adjusted risk-ratio with the help of binary logistic regression analyses using a sample size of 3184 rural-urban mothers retrieved from the latest Pakistan Demographic and Health Survey 2012-13 (PDHS).

Results

The urban mothers without education are more likely to have stunted and underweighted infants than rural ones relative to educated mothers. Similarly, urban mothers without education are more likely to have underweight kids than rural ones relative to mothers with higher schooling. Rural (urban) mothers with poor (moderate) economic position have little more chances of stunted infants than urban (rural) mothers comparing with mothers having rich status. However, only urban mothers with poor status have more chances of underweight for kids relative to mothers with rich class. The rural mothers with empowerment and with seeking for medical services are less likelihood to have stunted infants than urban ones relative to their counterparts.

Value of the Study

The impact of mediating factors arising from education on rural infants’ health is higher than that on urban infants.




DOI: https://doi.org/10.2427/12978

References



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EBPH Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Public Health | ISSN 2282-0930

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.