Original Articles

Sociodemographic characteristics influence tobacco usage patterns in adult cancer survivors


Abstract


Introduction:The risk of developing new cancers persists for 15 million cancer survivors in the United States, yet many continue to engage in high-risk behaviours. This analysis aims to compare tobacco use in cancer-free respondents to cancer survivors, in order to elucidate trends and behavioural patterns associated with increased tobacco use in cancer survivors. 

Methods:The Health Information National Trends Survey data of 2014 and 2017 was used for this study. Descriptive statistics were generated, and the likelihood of tobacco use based on weighted data was predicted using logistic regression. Included in the study population were 941 cancer survivors, predominantly white (80%), 60-70 years of age, married (52%), with some level of education past high school (65%). 

Results: The current smoking rate for all cancer survivors was 12.1%, and 14.3% for those without cancer. Lower education levels, being separated or divorced, female, and lower household incomes were notable variables, increasing likelihood of cigarette use amongst cancer survivors. Cervical cancer (19.2%) and lymphoma (20%) survivors were most likely to smoke cigarettes compared to other cancer survivors.

Conclusion: This study established cancer survivors with specific sociodemographic characteristics experience greater risk of cigarette use. These outcomes suggest cancer survivors with only high school education or lower, and those with household incomes of less than $35,000 should be target for personalised tobacco cessation interventions in the future. Due to the high prevalence of smoking in cervical cancer survivors and increased risk of tobacco-linked cancers, specific focus must be directed to female cancer survivors, who are twice as likely to smoke as men.


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DOI: https://doi.org/10.2427/13117

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EBPH Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Public Health | ISSN 2282-0930

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.